The Removal of the Cherokee Indians from Georgia, Including His Speeches in the United States Congress on the Indian Question...His Official Correspondence on the Removal of the Cherokees During His Two Terms of Governor of Georgia, and Later as United States Commissioner to the Cherokees, 1827-1841. CHEROKEE, Wilson Lumpkin.

The Removal of the Cherokee Indians from Georgia, Including His Speeches in the United States Congress on the Indian Question...His Official Correspondence on the Removal of the Cherokees During His Two Terms of Governor of Georgia, and Later as United States Commissioner to the Cherokees, 1827-1841

Wormsloe [GA] and New York: Privately Printed, Dodd Mead Publishers, 1907.

First Edition. Hardcover. Good. Two-volume set, one of 500 issued. Large 8vo, original dark red cloth. pp 369; 328, with a frontispiece in each volume. Boards scuffed and bumped, old damptstain to title and frontis of volume II, with following pages a bit rippled. Otherwise sound and clean. Memoirs of Wilson Lumpkin (1783-1870), compiled by Wymberley Jones DeRenne from Lumpkin's manuscript. Lumpkin was Governor of Georgia at the height of the crisis over Indian policy and Cherokee removal. He was a loyal supporter of Andrew Jackson and an ardent advocate for the removal. "As governor, Lumpkin refused to send representation for the state in the Supreme Court's hearing of Worcester v. Georgia (1832), and he ignored, with President Jackson's tacit consent, the court's ruling that Georgia had no authority over the Indians' lands. Instead, Lumpkin promoted and secured legislative approval for a survey of the Cherokee lands, for the creation of new counties in the region, and for a lottery to distribute the land to white settlers as a way to encourage the Indians' migration. When the signing of the Treaty of New Echota in 1835 formally provided for removal, Lumpkin, on finishing his term as governor, became a commissioner to oversee the treaty's enforcement. When he entered the Senate two years later, he continued to keep Indian removal at the center of public attention; he also advised General Winfield Scott on ways to carry out the terms of the New Echota treaty. No other politician in the Jacksonian period deserved greater responsibility for the tragedy of the Trail of Tears" (ANB). Howes L-567.

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