Thoughts on Physical Education: Being a Discourse delivered to a Convention of Teachers in Lexington, KY. on the 6th and 7th of Nov. 1833. HEALTH AND MEDICINE, Charles Caldwell.
Thoughts on Physical Education: Being a Discourse delivered to a Convention of Teachers in Lexington, KY. on the 6th and 7th of Nov. 1833

Thoughts on Physical Education: Being a Discourse delivered to a Convention of Teachers in Lexington, KY. on the 6th and 7th of Nov. 1833

Boston: Marsh, Capen, & Lyon, 1834.

First Edition. Hardcover. Very good. 4.75" x 7.5", 133 pp + errata slip. Original blue cloth with paper spine label. Extremities rubbed, spine cloth chipped, shadow of bookplate removed from front free endpaper; very good. Caldwell (1772-1853) was a student (and at times a critic) of Benjamin Rush and founder of the Louisville Medical Institute. He was one of several American physicians of the early nineteenth century who popularized the term "physical education," by which they meant the instruction of children in all matters relating to the body and its overall health. In this work, which achieved national recognition, Caldwell argues that physical education is an essential companion to moral and intellectual education, for without it "man cannot attain the perfection of his nature." It should include "every thing that, by bearing in any way on the human body, might injure or benefit in its health, vigor, or fitness for action," including "diet, cleanliness, clothing atmospherical temperature, respiration, muscular exercise, sleep, and animal passions."

Item #14918

Price: $100.00