Triscornia, The Government Immigrant Station at Havana, Cuba. J. A. Wright, Irene Aloha Wright.
Triscornia, The Government Immigrant Station at Havana, Cuba
Triscornia, The Government Immigrant Station at Havana, Cuba
Triscornia, The Government Immigrant Station at Havana, Cuba
Triscornia, The Government Immigrant Station at Havana, Cuba

Triscornia, The Government Immigrant Station at Havana, Cuba

No place or date of publication given, but ca. 1910, printed by Poole Brothers, Chicago. 8 x 5.5 inches, 31 pp, with illustrations from photographs, in original illustrated wrappers. Light soiling and abrasion to wrappers; very good. Offers a detailed discussion of the process of immigrating to Cuba and assurances that Triscornia -- the station where immigrants who arrive in Cuba without employment or family are detained until they have a means of support -- is a clean and comfortable place that protects new arrivals from being turned out onto the streets and preyed upon by "avaricious inkeepers" or "dishonest employment bureaus and their agents and allies." The book describes the processing of new arrivals who do have money or relatives in Cuba, services provided to help immigrants find jobs, the types of jobs most commonly available (on the sugar plantations, tobacco fields, mines, and railroad), and quaratine and customs procedures. The author was was an American journalist and historian who lived in Mexico, Cuba, and Spain and wrote several books on colonial history in the Caribbean. She worked for the Havana Post from 1904 to 1905, and then became a city editor for the Havana Telegraph. In 1909, she purchased The Cuba Magazine, a weekly politics and culture magazine for American readers which she owned until 1914. This booklet was also published in Spanish. Both editions are quite scarce, with no copies of the English edition located in OCLC, and just one of the Spanish.

Item #21337

Price: $250.00

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