Item #21628 Collection of 145 Antique Christmas Cards Created for Soldiers and their Families During World War I
Collection of 145 Antique Christmas Cards Created for Soldiers and their Families During World War I
Collection of 145 Antique Christmas Cards Created for Soldiers and their Families During World War I
Collection of 145 Antique Christmas Cards Created for Soldiers and their Families During World War I
Collection of 145 Antique Christmas Cards Created for Soldiers and their Families During World War I
Collection of 145 Antique Christmas Cards Created for Soldiers and their Families During World War I
Collection of 145 Antique Christmas Cards Created for Soldiers and their Families During World War I
Collection of 145 Antique Christmas Cards Created for Soldiers and their Families During World War I
Collection of 145 Antique Christmas Cards Created for Soldiers and their Families During World War I
Collection of 145 Antique Christmas Cards Created for Soldiers and their Families During World War I
Collection of 145 Antique Christmas Cards Created for Soldiers and their Families During World War I
Collection of 145 Antique Christmas Cards Created for Soldiers and their Families During World War I
Collection of 145 Antique Christmas Cards Created for Soldiers and their Families During World War I
Collection of 145 Antique Christmas Cards Created for Soldiers and their Families During World War I
Collection of 145 Antique Christmas Cards Created for Soldiers and their Families During World War I
Collection of 145 Antique Christmas Cards Created for Soldiers and their Families During World War I

Collection of 145 Antique Christmas Cards Created for Soldiers and their Families During World War I

Very good. A fantastic collection of 145 different cards used to send Christmas greetings to and from soldiers serving in the First World War. The Christmas season was a time when many soldiers felt the separation from home most acutely, and the cards they sent and received helped to connect them to faraway family and friends. Cards were available to soldiers commercially, from relief organizations such as the Red Cross and YMCA, and often from their units, many of which had their own cards printed to convey regimental pride. While these greetings expressed the spirit of Christmas, most also sent a clear message of patriotism and strength that helped keep up morale. As Alan Petrulis writes on Metropostcard, "Military Christmas cards had a fine line to walk. They were meant to reassure the receiver that all was okay on the front lines despite the separation, and that a holiday would still be had. While this message ensures a bit of normalcy in lives that have been turned upside down, it cannot ignore the need to show solders still being diligent in keeping family and the homeland safe. In most depictions of joyful gatherings there is usually a single distant sentry keeping a watchful eye on the enemy. Rifles, cannon and machine guns often invade these peaceful scenes to remind us that this celebration is taking place in a war zone." Cards were also sent in the other direction -- from home to the soldier on the front. Many of these combine patriotic and sentimental themes. For example, a card showing an American flag surrounded by a Christmas wreath reads "Tho' you aren't with us this Christmas / You're one of us still, you know, / And we send love and best wishes / Wherever you may go." One with a bald eagle bearing a flag reads simply "One hundred million Americans besides myself are thinking of you today." This collection is comprised of 108 greeting cards and 37 postcards and includes examples from the United States (about half the collection), England, Scotland, Ireland, Canada, Austria-Hungary, and Germany. There are also cards printed in France, but intended for the use of American and British soldiers. Some bear handwritten messages; many do not (having been mailed in an envelope with a letter). Several mailing envelopes and one full-length letter are present. There are at least two dozen regimental cards (most quite rare), some of which list specific engagements in which the unit participated. There are YMCA cards, homemade cards, cards sent from ships and hospitals, and cards printed just for individual soldiers. Two cards relate to military activity within the United States (Camp Dodge in Iowa and the First New York Cavalry, stationed in Texas). Many of the cards are adorned with patriotic ribbons, some with miniature flags; a few have photographic illustrations. In sum, a diverse and fascinating collection with both display and research potential. .

Item #21628

Price: $900.00