1880s Wyoming Territory Legal Brief Arguing that the Post Trader at Fort McKinney is Subject to Local Taxation and Regulation

1880s Wyoming Territory Legal Brief Arguing that the Post Trader at Fort McKinney is Subject to Local Taxation and Regulation

Very good. Handwritten legal brief, apparently a draft, 7 pp on legal-sized sheets (rectos only), with occasional corrections throughout and additional penciled notes at the end. Titled "Territory of Wyoming, County of Johnson vs. John H. Conrad." No author supplied; undated, but pre-1890 (statehood). An interesting document in which the Territory argues that although post traders are situated on U.S. Army outposts, because they have no formal military standing (unlike army sutlers, their pre-Civil War predecessors) and they are subject to the same laws and ordinances as any other local resident. The case in question relates to whether Conrad, the post trader at Fort McKinney, was required to have (and pay for) a license to sell "spiritous, vinous, and malt liquors." Conrad apparently felt he was under no such obligation since he was operating on a federal military post, but this brief points out that that he was also selling goods to civilians and that he is a citizen of Johnson County who "can exercise the right of suffrage and be elected to office in the same way as anyone else." Moreover, "the courts are open to him for the enforcement of his contracts and for protection of his person and property just as they are to any one else," so "why should not he be required to bey the laws and pay his just portion of taxas as well to enjoys [these] priviliges and protections?" Several legal precedents are cited to bolster this argument, although the writers acknowlegde that "we have not had access to such books of authority as the delicacy and importance of the question involved naturally demands."

Item #21701

Price: $200.00