Archive of a Police Sketch Artist Working in Camden County, New Jersey, 1970s-1990s
Archive of a Police Sketch Artist Working in Camden County, New Jersey, 1970s-1990s
Archive of a Police Sketch Artist Working in Camden County, New Jersey, 1970s-1990s
Archive of a Police Sketch Artist Working in Camden County, New Jersey, 1970s-1990s
Archive of a Police Sketch Artist Working in Camden County, New Jersey, 1970s-1990s
Archive of a Police Sketch Artist Working in Camden County, New Jersey, 1970s-1990s
Archive of a Police Sketch Artist Working in Camden County, New Jersey, 1970s-1990s
Archive of a Police Sketch Artist Working in Camden County, New Jersey, 1970s-1990s
Archive of a Police Sketch Artist Working in Camden County, New Jersey, 1970s-1990s
Archive of a Police Sketch Artist Working in Camden County, New Jersey, 1970s-1990s
Archive of a Police Sketch Artist Working in Camden County, New Jersey, 1970s-1990s
Archive of a Police Sketch Artist Working in Camden County, New Jersey, 1970s-1990s
Archive of a Police Sketch Artist Working in Camden County, New Jersey, 1970s-1990s
Archive of a Police Sketch Artist Working in Camden County, New Jersey, 1970s-1990s

Archive of a Police Sketch Artist Working in Camden County, New Jersey, 1970s-1990s

Very good. A fascinating collection of materials relating to the 25-year career of a police sketch artist employed by the Camden County [NJ] Prosecutor's Office. Agent Clarence (Chuck) Pierce, Jr. (1933-2021) began working for the Prosecutor's Office in 1971, after an eleven-year stint as a patrolman with the Borough of Runnemede Police. He had previous work experience as a draftsman and was assigned to work as a sketch artist no later than 1974. This archive includes 28 of his original composite sketches (drawn in pencil on 10" x 13" sheets of thick cardstock) dated between 1974 and 1995, as well as approximately 25 photocopies or photographs of other sketches he made. Many are accompanied by a photograph of the actual perpetrator, which in most cases bears an impressive resemblance to the sketch. Many are also accompanied by an incident report or other paperwork relating to the case. In a few cases, there are newspaper articles that include the sketch. The most notorious of these is the "Pine Hill Massacre" -- in which a father, mother, and three-year-old daughter were slain in a mob hit gone wrong (the hit man got the wrong house). In that case, the sketch was made based on the description of the only survivor, a five-year-old girl.

The archive also contains Pierce's materials for use of the Penry Facial Recognition Technique, also called PHOTO-Fit. Developed by photograpoher Jacques Penry around 1969, the basic (white male) Photo-Fit kit provided the sketch artist with photographic images (called "sections") of 180 forehead/hairlines, 90 sets of eyes, 84 noses, 94 mouths, and 71 chins, which allowed for the creation of more than 9 million face compoisitions. The number was further enlarged by a selection of eyebrows, ears, moustaches, beards, eyeglasses, and headgear. These kits are rare in the marketplace. Present here are binders containing the instructions that came with the kit, ca. 55 pages (both from the basic kit and the "Afro-Asian Section") with facial features arranged in groups (20 to a page), and more than 500 life-size sections, which were intended to be arranged into faces as the artist worked with the witness. Another folder contains a wig catalogue that Pierce used as a reference for women's hairstyles, a form used for interviewing witnesses for sketch purposes, an FBI facial identification fact sheet, and some articles on drawing, facial memory, and facial reconstruction. Also in the archive are a folder of miscellaneous police paperwork (outline for taking statements, departmental directives, miranda forms, and a 1996-1998 contract between the Police Benevolent Assocition and the Camden County Prosecutor's Office) and another containing some of Pierce's personnel paperwork, including resumes, job descriptions, and certificates and commendations he received for a job well done. In April, 1996, for example, he received a letter from the Chief of the Pennasuaken Police Department stating that "your composite sketch was remarkably like the actual appearance of the perpetrator" and "warrants were issued for his arrest based in large part on the outstanding work you did in this manner." In all, a most interesting collection offering an inside view of this important part of the investigative process.

Item #21971

Price: $1,500.00