Item #22807 A Canoe Voyage of the Minnay Sotor; with An Account of the Lead and Copper Deposits in Wisconsin; of the Gold Region in the Cherokee Country; and Sketches of Popular Manners. G. W Featherstonhaugh.
A Canoe Voyage of the Minnay Sotor; with An Account of the Lead and Copper Deposits in Wisconsin; of the Gold Region in the Cherokee Country; and Sketches of Popular Manners
A Canoe Voyage of the Minnay Sotor; with An Account of the Lead and Copper Deposits in Wisconsin; of the Gold Region in the Cherokee Country; and Sketches of Popular Manners
A Canoe Voyage of the Minnay Sotor; with An Account of the Lead and Copper Deposits in Wisconsin; of the Gold Region in the Cherokee Country; and Sketches of Popular Manners
A Canoe Voyage of the Minnay Sotor; with An Account of the Lead and Copper Deposits in Wisconsin; of the Gold Region in the Cherokee Country; and Sketches of Popular Manners

A Canoe Voyage of the Minnay Sotor; with An Account of the Lead and Copper Deposits in Wisconsin; of the Gold Region in the Cherokee Country; and Sketches of Popular Manners

London: Richard Bentley, 1847.

First Edition. Hardcover. Very good. Two volumes, pp. xiv, 416, with lithographed frontispiece and 2 folding maps (all backed on linen); vii, 350, with linen-backed frontispiece. In a later simple blue loth binding. Both volumes well rubbed at the corners, evidence of removal of an ink stamp on title page of Vol. I, which also has a small white stain on the front board. Text clean, bindings tight; very good. Featherstonhaugh, a British-born gentleman farmer and self-trained geologist, began his journey at Washington, D.C. and traveled to Detroit via Pittsburgh and Cleveland. From there he navigated by canoe on Lake Huron and Lake Michigan to Mackinac and Green Bay, and then via the Fox and Mississippi Rivers to Saint Anthony and Fort Snelling. His party negotiated the Minnesota River as far as Lake Traverse on the Dakota border, before returning to Galena, and St. Louis and then traveling through Tennessee, Georgia, and the Carolinas. Of the southern portion of his journey, Clark (III, 39) writes: "[His] principal interests were the Indians and the gold-mining operations in Georgia and North Carolina, and these items are described in considerable detail." In Georgia, he was present at a council held by the Cherokees and the United States Commissioners at Red Clay. Field 530; Howes F-67; Sabin 23959.

Item #22807

Price: $500.00